Skip to main content

About your Search

20121129
20121207
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
by leaving town before making a deal on the fiscal cliff. what's going on? if you take an aspirin to prevent heart trouble check the labor. our own dr. sanjay gupta tells us what a new study says about the effects of coated tablets. we'll also hear what happened during in flight emergency during one of the world's newest high-tech planes. i'm wolf blitzer, you're in the situation room. >>> with just 27 days to go until all of us are hit with tax increases, takes it across the board a cut of $55 billion. people have it in their power to avoid the so-called fiscal cliff aren't negotiating, they're not debating right now, so many of them simply leaving town. but there's more going on than meets the eye. let's bring in our senior congressional correspondent dana basch, she has the latest. >> reporter: there's so much political theater around here right now, you could say tickets. one of today's acts was the house leaving. lawmakers streaming out of the capitol hill, racing to their cars to get to the airport and go home. it's a scene you usually see on a thursday afternoon or friday morning, not
left to make a deal before the country hits what's called the fiscal cliff. that's a combination of across the board tax increases for everyone, coupled with cuts in spending like defense, education, health care, and housing assistance. let's go live to our chief white house correspondent jessica yellin with the very latest. jessica? >> reporter: president obama has now personally turned down speaker boehner's opening offer to avert the fiscal cliff. he did it in a tv interview. what does president obama think of speaker boehner's proposal to avert the fiscal cliff? >> unfortunately, the speaker's proposal right now is still out of balance. he talks about $800 billion worth of revenues but says he's going to do that by lowering rates. when you look at the math, it doesn't work. >> reporter: he won't agree to eliminate a tax deduction for contributions to charity. >> every hospital and university and nonfor profit agency across the country would find themselves on the verge of collapse. so that's not a realistic option. >> reporter: but the president didn't say all this to speaker
the fiscal cliff. the way republicans in congress and the president solved the debt ceiling crisis was to build this cliff, that we're now supposedly dangling off of. they inve' we're up against. the debt ceiling fight was a disaster, and now republicans, surprise, want to have that fight again. "the new york times" reports that one idea bouncing around the right side of the aisle is this. the republicans will extend tax cuts for the middle class, and then when they need to raise the debt ceiling, quote, demand deep concessions on medicare and social security as a price to raise the debt ceiling. one republican senator reportedly called the debt ceiling the line in the stand. the odds are pretty close to zero that we mint a $1 trillion coin in order to pay off some of the debt. but there's striking movement in the direction of changing the rules so we don't ever have to fight over this completely unnecessary issue ever again. remember, this is important. the debt ceiling isn't about incurring future debt. it's about the money congress has already duly authorized and appropriated an
than not. >> all right. well, with 25 days to go until the year-end fiscal cliff deadline, president obama and speaker boehner spoke on the phone yesterday for the first time in days. both men agreed not to publicly characterize how the conversation went. but the stalemate in negotiations entered new territory yesterday with treasury secretary tim geithner suggesting the white house is ready to go off the cliff if republicans refuse to raise taxes on the 2%. >> if republicans do not agree to that, is the administration prepared to go over the fiscal cliff? >> oh, absolutely. again, there's no prospect to an agreement that doesn't involve those rates going up on the top 2% of the wealthiest americans -- remember, it's only 2%. the size of the problem in some sense is so large, it can't be solved without rates going up as part of that. again, i think there's broad recognition of that reality now. >> one fallback option republicans are reportedly considering is to accept tax cuts for the middle class, allow rates to go up for the wealthiest, and then start the fight over again during de
begin with breaking news. we're looking at what the white house is offering to stop the fiscal cliff stalemate. drastic mandatory tax hikes and spending cuts will kick in with the new year unless, unless the white house and republicans can reach a deal. for weeks, gop lawmakers have said we're just waiting for the white house to give details, specifics, some numbers. well, tonight that's happened. the white house is calling their bluff and they've laid out how they want to cut the debt. jessica yellin is over at the white house for us tonight with new developments. jessica, what are the specifics of this offer tonight? >> reporter: hi, wolf. according to senior officials on both sides of the aisle, the president is asking for $1.6 trillion in new taxes. that includes raising taxes for families who make $250,000 or more. you'll recognize that as a pledge from his campaign. and it also includes limiting deductions and loopholes as well as other changes to capital gains and dividends taxes. well, that is the headline for republicans, wolf, who say it is far more money in tax rates than
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)